Coverage, Capacity, Density.

Last year at a seminar, wireless coverage inside the convention centre was excellent.  The numbers of people (density) jumping on the service however, affected the capacity of the centre’s network. While accessibility was excellent, the use of the application on the service was really slow.

Enterprise wireless coverage is more than just reach. It usually has to support x numbers of users seamlessly roaming between business areas without dropping connectivity and support a connection quality to complete business activities in an expedient manner.

Wi-Fi should invisibly and reliably, work in the background.  A slow network or a blackspot area quickly becomes noticed – internal social media is often the place where problems are ‘discussed’. Plugging these gaps usually has a cost involved but the value gained from increased productivity and job satisfaction, often outweighs this.

In the wired world, coverage means both ends of the link are connected.  With wireless, the strongest device has the better coverage. The power and ability of antennas (and therefore the reach and signal quality) on a tablet or smartphone will not match that of a laptop or the wireless infrastructure.  Both ends of a Wi-Fi link should therefore be aligned in order that the quality of coverage expectations are consistent.

So what are the factors that determine our Wi-Fi service experience? Fundamentally, it is a combination of coverage, capacity, type of business activity (e.g multimedia), numbers of users and the types of devices being used. Client device selection has a measurable impact in a wireless environment; since Wi-Fi is a shared resource, too many ‘slow’ devices will lower performance for everyone.

To sum up, coverage and capacity define the infrastructure needed to deliver a certain level of service, to an expected density of user devices.  Get it right and you won’t notice the network at all.