Netflix on the business network

While the network is carrying business critical applications, all well and good.  But Netflix and Soundcloud streaming?  They’re usually red flags.

Enter Application Awareness. One of the most useful outcomes from deploying enterprise-grade wireless is obtaining valuable insights into what the network is actually busy doing and the ability to act upon that information automatically.

The network is an asset that an organisation uses like any other tool to run its business.  Having visibility into how that asset is being utilised is of tremendous value.

Application Awareness leads to a higher level of detailed visibility into an organisation’s actual, ground-level operations, of how users are using the network services.  From this a business is able to identify trends, prevent threats, or recognise that it may need to improve the overall service experience e.g. an increase in capacity.

Many enterprise wireless vendors build Application Awareness into their products.  They also make it easy for administrators to enforce a differentiated service based on profiles;  triggered by application sensors built into the product.  When sensors detect a voice call for example, a certain level of network resources can be awarded to it.  When the sensors detect music streaming, the network can be configured to respond to that differently.

The system can generate regular reports on all of the above, including the health of the network.  The information that these reports provide to the business becomes valuable from Day 1 and indispensible in supporting and optimising the utilisation of this business asset.

An organisation that before was somewhat blind to what the Wi-Fi was busy doing, and not entirely sure of how their asset was being utilised, now has valuable insights and an input for future planning.

Business Agility and Wi-Fi

Often in business, time = money.

In a competitive market, a business must stay agile; whether it is rapid development of new ideas to open new markets, reaction to competitive threats, or using new intelligence gained from data mining (Big Data) to improve their market share.

For a business to be agile in supporting the primary business objectives, technology is considered more and more of a competitive advantage but only if it can enable the toolsets (applications and infrastructure for example) needed by staff.

The computer network is enablement.  This is not to say it is more important than any other business asset;  just that we all know what happens when the network goes down.  Productivity stops. People complain.  Customer Service is impacted.

Wi-Fi has shown that it can improve productivity in the workplace.  Staff have the flexibility to move around the office or campus environments.  By not being tied to their desks they are able to participate and work where and when required; improving not only productivity but often staff satisfaction/morale and staff retention.  It takes less time to install a wireless network than to run wired infrastructure cabling throughout a building – it is certainly cheaper – hence the office is available earlier and the business of doing business is accelerated.

BYOD devices such as tablets and Smartphones drive Wi-Fi adoption in business even further.

The ‘consumerisation’ revolution has been elevated largely through maturing Wi-Fi technology.  iPads in hotel rooms for guests to order services, restaurant waiters with Wi-Fi connected devices to order reliably,  immediately and error-free, self-registration through your smartphone at events…Companies or organisations are constantly innovating using technology over the Wi-Fi network to showcase new services and/or new products.

I see Wi-Fi as a true enabler of improved agility in today’s business environment.

When Wi-Fi is professionally designed and implemented, it will always be there. Invisible, reliable and immediate, like turning on a light switch.