Plain English Site Survey Reports

Following a wireless site survey, many organisations are sent automated wireless site survey reports in excess of 80 pages.  These tree-unfriendly documents are the result of a click of a button on site survey software which spits out a colourful but massive report in a few seconds.

For a business however, they are about as readable and interesting as a dot matrix printout of line items at a warehouse.  Everyone remember dot matrix printers?

Essentially, an automated site survey report is raw data.  Factual, accurate and…Unhelpful.  It doesn’t tell the business anything.  A business without wireless specialists (the majority) will look at it and still have fundamental questions:

  • The heat maps are all green, so why is my WiFi rubbish?
  • What are your recommendations?
  • Should I be worried, is this normal?
  • Is -50dBm bad?  It sounds bad.
  • What is Channel Overlap? Do we need more of it?
  • This is unintelligible.

It is nice marketing by wireless survey software vendors, to say ‘Hey, just press this button and your job is done; report generated. You can even put your own logo/branding in.’  It sounds good in theory and it actually is a real time-saver.  But, does your doctor hand you a blood analysis report – composed of fun latin names – and leave you to interpret it on your own?

Myself, I created a template in MS Word.  Each survey report is written in plain english, removing jargon wherever possible and customised to address the reason for the site survey in the first place.  For example: to troubleshoot poor performance or to prove a new service works as designed or, a pre-deployment survey of the current environment.

The report’s content is supported by adding screenshots/tables from the survey into the body of the document or as an appendix.  It also avoids sending a 20MB attachment of irrelevant data to my client.

This is my personal way of doing things and so far, customer feedback has been very positive.

In summary, I think if automated reports are going to be used and sent to customer IT managers, then at minimum they should be accompanied by a separate document. A summary in plain english that offers analysis, findings of interest and (if requested) recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

Coverage, Capacity, Density.

Last year at a seminar, wireless coverage inside the convention centre was excellent.  The numbers of people (density) jumping on the service however, affected the capacity of the centre’s network. While accessibility was excellent, the use of the application on the service was really slow.

Enterprise wireless coverage is more than just reach. It usually has to support x numbers of users seamlessly roaming between business areas without dropping connectivity and support a connection quality to complete business activities in an expedient manner.

Wi-Fi should invisibly and reliably, work in the background.  A slow network or a blackspot area quickly becomes noticed – internal social media is often the place where problems are ‘discussed’. Plugging these gaps usually has a cost involved but the value gained from increased productivity and job satisfaction, often outweighs this.

In the wired world, coverage means both ends of the link are connected.  With wireless, the strongest device has the better coverage. The power and ability of antennas (and therefore the reach and signal quality) on a tablet or smartphone will not match that of a laptop or the wireless infrastructure.  Both ends of a Wi-Fi link should therefore be aligned in order that the quality of coverage expectations are consistent.

So what are the factors that determine our Wi-Fi service experience? Fundamentally, it is a combination of coverage, capacity, type of business activity (e.g multimedia), numbers of users and the types of devices being used. Client device selection has a measurable impact in a wireless environment; since Wi-Fi is a shared resource, too many ‘slow’ devices will lower performance for everyone.

To sum up, coverage and capacity define the infrastructure needed to deliver a certain level of service, to an expected density of user devices.  Get it right and you won’t notice the network at all.