A Guide to Wi-Fi Requirements.

Do you know what you want, what you really, really want?

Sometimes we need to flesh out real requirements for a Wi-Fi service.  A common request from customers is simply, “Install Wi-Fi at xyz location”.  Actual requirements start with understanding the desired outcome or performance expectations and working backwards from there.

There are relevant questions.  Such as what type of user experience is required and what density of users will be simultaneously using the Wi-Fi service. Or what existing systems does the service need to integrate with?

Business questions first.  If we don’t understand the business reasons for wireless in the first place, we won’t be able to design a solution that meets expectations.  Why is the business investing in a wireless service, what are the required business outcomes and timelines and how will the business measure the success of the installation?  What applications will they run and what type of activities do the business expect users to perform over the wireless medium?

Technical questions that address wireless functionality naturally follow. The customer may have standards that must be followed to integrate a wireless service:  user authentication, encryption, device management, reporting, logging, wireless intrusion detection (and desired responses), application performance, density of users, or different user groups.

From answers to these business and technical questions, we are able to begin noting the Wi-Fi requirements.  The discovery phase will assist here:  identifying supporting infrastructure, is there adequate bandwidth for the solution, is Quality of Service (QoS) required for application performance and which 802.11 standards need to be supported.

During the process of discovery, in some situations we may find that a Wi-Fi solution will not actually be fit for purpose!

The physical environment where wireless service will be installed prompts its own questions.  If site access for an inspection is difficult: a picture tells a thousand words.  A few well-chosen photos of the wireless environment will tell us a lot about what needs further analysis.  The environment will mandate if internal or external (weatherproof) Wi-Fi equipment is necessary, if internal or external antennas will be required, where there may be coverage challenges and so forth.  Physical security of equipment inside the environment should also be taken into consideration.

Site surveys are crucial.  We will want to know if the proposed environment is subject to wireless interference or,  if it has to contend with 50 foreign Wi-Fi networks fighting for the same channel space.  Site surveys can discover useful information that then become technical requirements that feed into the design.  For example, if a site survey uncovers heavy amounts of interference on a commonly used channel by Wi-Fi, then the design can avoid using this channel.

Most importantly: with Wi-Fi it is all about the client.  If the technology the client is using to connect to the wireless infrastructure is poor, then the experience will be poor.  No matter how good the wireless system.  If you have a mixed bag of client devices, old and new, fast and slow; all of this will affect the design.

So tell us what you want.  What you really, really want.